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Post by sharperhawk on Mon Jul 30, 2018 5:24 pm

I thought I would create a topic for posting links to interesting news, articles, blog posts, etc. related to health. Not every link will generate discussion so it's kind of a waste to start a new topic every time. Feel free to add your own links to interesting things you come across.




➡️ 3 Foods That May Help You Sleep Better - Tldr: kiwifruit (questionable), protein plus carbs (yes), tart cherries (yes). Nice analysis of supporting studies.
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Post by sharperhawk on Sat Aug 04, 2018 4:47 pm

➡️ Complementary medicine for cancer can decrease survival

"People who received complementary therapy for curable cancers were more likely to refuse at least one component of their conventional cancer treatment, and were more likely to die as a result, according to researchers from Yale Cancer Center and the Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy and Effectiveness Research Center (COPPER) at Yale School of Medicine."

The news item doesn't mention it, but the study found that among those who used complementary cancer therapy and did not refuse conventional treatments, the death rate was no worse than conventional treatment only.
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Post by sharperhawk on Tue Aug 28, 2018 3:15 pm

➡️ Fitbit's 150 billion hours of heart data reveal secrets about health

Fitbit's data show how resting heart rate (RHR) is correlated with age, sex, BMI, exercise, and sleep. Lots of cool charts.
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Post by Rig D on Wed Aug 29, 2018 7:54 am

Very interesting stuff and pretty informative. Thanks for posting.
I don't have a Fitbit, and probably won't since they seem to accumulate all your personal data (yeah, I'm paranoid about that kind of thing.) So I am ignorant on how things work in Fitbit land, how do they determine what the Resting Heart Rate is, and how they know that from the data collected? Also, it isn't clear to me if the data represents someone wearing the unit 24 hrs/day all the time, or whether it is just waking hours (or time the unit is worn) and what the heart rate is by time of day.
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Post by Meant2Move on Fri Aug 31, 2018 7:51 pm


Thanks for posting that [Fitbit] link, I hadn't seen it and found it interesting.

@Rig, I'm guessing a good number of Fitbit (or Garmin) folks are like me and hate to go anywhere/do anything without the thing attached, thus aside from being in the shower or sex, I nearly always have it on.
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Post by Narrowminded on Fri Aug 31, 2018 8:50 pm

Interesting article for sure.

I’m like M2M, always have it on.
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Post by tomi1000 on Sun Sep 02, 2018 6:17 pm

Rig - I'm with you.
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Post by sharperhawk on Tue Sep 25, 2018 12:10 pm

Several recent studies have suggested that exercise makes a negligible contribution to weight loss or maintenance. Though the case study below looked at only one pair of twins, it does follow them for 30 years. Small differences can accumulate over decades.

➡️ Muscle health and performance in monozygotic twins with 30 years of discordant exercise habits

Abstract

Introduction  Physical health and function depend upon both genetic inheritance and environmental factors (e.g., exercise training).

Purpose  To enhance the understanding of heritability/adaptability, we explored the skeletal muscle health and physiological performance of monozygotic (MZ) twins with > 30 years of chronic endurance training vs. no specific/consistent exercise.

Methods  One pair of male MZ twins (age = 52 years; Trained Twin, TT; Untrained Twin, UT) underwent analyses of: (1) anthropometric characteristics and blood profiles, (2) markers of cardiovascular and pulmonary health, and (3) skeletal muscle size, strength, and power and molecular markers of muscle health.

Results  This case study represents the most comprehensive physiological comparison of MZ twins with this length and magnitude of differing exercise history. TT exhibited: (1) lower body mass, body fat%, resting heart rate, blood pressure, cholesterol, triglycerides, and plasma glucose, (2) greater relative cycling power, anaerobic endurance, and aerobic capacity  (VO2max), but lower muscle size/strength and poorer muscle quality, (3) more MHC I (slow-twitch) and fewer MHC IIa (fast-twitch) fibers, (4) greater AMPK protein expression, and (5) greater PAX7, IGF1Ec, IGF1Ea, and FN14 mRNA expression than UT.

Conclusions  Several measured differences are the largest reported between MZ twins (TT expressed 55% more MHC I fibers, 12.4 ml/kg/min greater  VO2max, and 8.6% lower body fat% vs. UT). These data collectively (a) support utilizing chronic endurance training to improve body composition and cardiovascular health and (b) suggest the cardiovascular and skeletal muscle systems exhibit greater plasticity than previously thought, further highlighting the importance of studying MZ twins with large (long-term) differences in exposomes.

Keywords  Fiber type · Myosin heavy chain · Maximal oxygen consumption · Endurance training · FN14 · PAX7 · Body composition · AMPK · Aerobic exercise · Aging
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Post by Rig D on Tue Sep 25, 2018 1:22 pm

Just reading your abstract, it certainly makes sense. The only finding that seems out of expectation is that TT had "...but lower muscle size/strength and poorer muscle quality, "
I'm presuming that "chronic endurance" is about what we in Primal refer to as chronic cardio. Perhaps the muscle quality thing is related to it being chronic training.
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Post by sharperhawk on Fri Oct 12, 2018 1:07 pm

➡️ Nearly 800 dietary supplements contained unapproved drug ingredients, study finds
Nearly 800 dietary supplements sold over the counter from 2007 through 2016 contained unapproved drug ingredients, a new analysis of US Food and Drug Administration data found....

Most of the adulterated products, about 45%, were marketed for sexual enhancement, weight loss (about 41%) or muscle building (12%). Drugs found in sexual enhancement products included sildenafil, tadalafil and vardenafil, all active ingredients in prescription medications intended for erectile dysfunction, which, when overused, can cause serious damage to the blood vessels.

The most common pharmaceutical ingredients detected in adulterated weight loss products were sibutramine, which was removed from the US market in 2010 due to cardiovascular risks, and the laxative phenolphthalein. Many of the adulterated muscle building products contained undeclared anabolic steroids, which, when abused, can lead to mental problems in the short term and kidney problems, liver damage and heart problems in the long term.

I didn't see any mention of supplements for vitamins, minerals, and other micronutrients. Anyway, it's the Wild West out there. Do your research and avoid companies without a good track record. Caveat emptor.
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Post by sharperhawk on Mon Feb 11, 2019 6:31 pm

Two new studies on the effects of ultra-processed foods.

➡️ Association Between Ultraprocessed Food Consumption and Risk of Mortality Among Middle-aged Adults in France (abstract only)

Abstract

Importance  Growing evidence indicates that higher intake of ultraprocessed foods is associated with higher incidence of noncommunicable diseases. However, to date, the association between ultraprocessed foods consumption and mortality risk has never been investigated.

Objective  To assess the association between ultraprocessed foods consumption and all-cause mortality risk.

Design, Setting, and Participants  This observational prospective cohort study selected adults, 45 years or older, from the French NutriNet-Santé Study, an ongoing cohort study that launched on May 11, 2009, and performed a follow-up through December 15, 2017 (a median of 7.1 years). Participants were selected if they completed at least 1 set of 3 web-based 24-hour dietary records during their first 2 years of follow-up. Self-reported data were collected at baseline, including sociodemographic, lifestyle, physical activity, weight and height, and anthropometrics.

Exposures  The ultraprocessed foods group (from the NOVA food classification system), characterized as ready-to-eat or -heat formulations made mostly from ingredients usually combined with additives. Proportion (in weight) of ultraprocessed foods in the diet was computed for each participant.

Main Outcomes and Measures  The association between proportion of ultraprocessed foods and overall mortality was the main outcome. Mean dietary intakes from all of the 24-hour dietary records available during the first 2 years of follow-up were calculated and considered as the baseline usual food-and-drink intakes. Mortality was assessed using CépiDC, the French national registry of specific mortality causes. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs were determined for all-cause mortality, using multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression models, with age as the underlying time metric.

Results  A total of 44 551 participants were included, of whom 32 549 (73.1%) were women, with a mean (SD) age at baseline of 56.7 (7.5) years. Ultraprocessed foods accounted for a mean (SD) proportion of 14.4% (7.6%) of the weight of total food consumed, corresponding to a mean (SD) proportion of 29.1% (10.9%) of total energy intake. Ultraprocessed foods consumption was associated with younger age (45-64 years, mean [SE] proportion of food in weight, 14.50% [0.04%]; P < .001), lower income (<€1200/mo, 15.58% [0.11%]; P < .001), lower educational level (no diploma or primary school, 15.50% [0.16%]; P < .001), living alone (15.02% [0.07%]; P < .001), higher body mass index (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared; ≥30, 15.98% [0.11%]; P < .001), and lower physical activity level (15.56% [0.08%]; P < .001). A total of 602 deaths (1.4%) occurred during follow-up. After adjustment for a range of confounding factors, an increase in the proportion of ultraprocessed foods consumed was associated with a higher risk of all-cause mortality (HR per 10% increment, 1.14; 95% CI, 1.04-1.27; P = .008).

Conclusions and Relevance  An increase in ultraprocessed foods consumption appears to be associated with an overall higher mortality risk among this adult population; further prospective studies are needed to confirm these findings and to disentangle the various mechanisms by which ultraprocessed foods may affect health.

➡️ Ultra-processed diets cause excess calorie intake and weight gain: A one-month inpatient randomized controlled trial of ad libitum food intake (preprint)

Summary

We investigated whether ultra-processed foods affect energy intake in 20 weight-stable adults, aged (mean±SE) 31.2±1.6 y and BMI=27±1.5 kg/m2. Subjects were admitted to the NIH Clinical Center and randomized to receive either ultra-processed or unprocessed diets for 2 weeks immediately followed by the alternate diet for 2 weeks. Meals were designed to be matched for presented calories, energy density, macronutrients, sugar, sodium, and fiber. Subjects were instructed to consume as much or as little as desired. Energy intake was greater during the ultra-processed diet (508±106 kcal/d; p=0.0001), with increased consumption of carbohydrate (280±54 kcal/d; p<0.0001) and fat (230±53 kcal/d; p=0.0004) but not protein (-2±12 kcal/d; p=0.85). Weight changes were highly correlated with energy intake (r=0.8, p<0.0001) with participants gaining 0.8±0.3 kg (p=0.01) during the ultra-processed diet and losing 1.1±0.3 kg (p=0.001) during the unprocessed diet. Limiting consumption of ultra-processed foods may be an effective strategy for obesity prevention and treatment.
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Post by Rig D on Mon Feb 11, 2019 7:19 pm

No big surprise, but glad to see someone looking into it
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Post by sharperhawk on Sun Mar 31, 2019 5:41 pm

A new study has compared age-related death and disease across countries.

➡️ Wide variations in how well or poorly people age
A 30-year gap separates countries with the highest and lowest ages at which people experience the health problems of a 65-year-old, according to a new scientific study.

Researchers found 76-year-olds in Japan and 46-year-olds in Papua New Guinea have the same level of age-related health problems as an "average" person aged 65.
Countries with highest equivalent age to global 65-year-olds in 2017:

1. Japan: 76.1 years
2. Switzerland: 76.1
3. France: 76.0
4. Singapore: 76.0
5. Kuwait: 75.3
6. South Korea: 75.1
7. Spain: 75.1
8. Italy: 74.8
9. Puerto Rico: 74.6
10. Peru: 74.3

The full journal article is free online:
➡️ Measuring population ageing: an analysis of the Global Burden of Disease Study 2017, The Lancet
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SDI is Sociodemographic Index, "a measure of overall development consisting of income per capita, average years of education, and total fertility rate under 25 years."

The ranking provides an interesting comparison with life expectancy. Many of the countries at the top of one list are also at the top of the other: Japan, Switzerland, Singapore, etc. However, Kuwait is ranked #76 in life expectancy and #5 in age-equivalence. The United States is #31 in life expectancy and #54 in age-equivalence.
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Post by Lovebird on Tue May 21, 2019 12:11 am

An update on the effects of ultra-processed foods study by Kevin Hall et al that Sharperhawk posted in Feb.

https://www.cell.com/cell-metabolism/fulltext/S1550-4131(19)30248-7

And since a picture is worth a thousand words: https://www.cell.com/cms/10.1016/j.cmet.2019.05.008/attachment/3e50c90d-ca83-48c3-80e4-82e925189f1b/mmc1

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Unprocessed dinner day 1: Beef tender roast (Tyson) Rice pilaf (basmati rice (Roland) with garlic, onions, sweet peppers and olive oil) Steamed broccoli Side salad (Green leaf lettuce, tomatoes, cucumbers) with balsamic vinaigrette (balsamic vinegar (Nature’s Promise) Orange slices Pecans (Monarch) Salt and Pepper (Monarch)
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Post by sharperhawk on Thu May 23, 2019 2:47 pm

Lovebird wrote:An update on the effects of ultra-processed foods study by Kevin Hall et al that Sharperhawk posted in Feb.

https://www.cell.com/cell-metabolism/fulltext/S1550-4131(19)30248-7

And since a picture is worth a thousand words: https://www.cell.com/cms/10.1016/j.cmet.2019.05.008/attachment/3e50c90d-ca83-48c3-80e4-82e925189f1b/mmc1

The second link has great visuals. There are several photos of both ultraprocessed and (relatively) unprocessed meals.
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Post by Rig D on Fri May 24, 2019 7:51 am

I looked at the Ultra Processed menus and photos, didn't venture any further. I'd feel like absolute crap eating that stuff.
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Post by Lovebird on Fri Jul 05, 2019 7:07 am

Rig D wrote:I looked at the Ultra Processed menus and photos, didn't venture any further. I'd feel like absolute crap eating that stuff.

You didn't think I posted that link for the UP crap foods, did you? Razz

Since the original attachment link no longer seems to work, here's the pdf link: https://www.cell.com/cms/10.1016/j.cmet.2019.05.008/attachment/a3c78242-8818-4a94-9c86-b59f92ee543c/mmc1.pdf

Personally I feel that the daily allowed amount of fruits in the (relatively) unprocessed meals is too high, especially with the snacks as well as fruits in meals, even for healthy and active people, and I don't like the suggested skim milk/gluten grains, but hey, whatever floats yer boat. It's definitely better than SAD.
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Post by sharperhawk on Fri Jul 05, 2019 12:22 pm

I saw this on Twitter a few days ago:

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Post by Narrowminded on Sat Jul 06, 2019 8:30 am

It’s interesting, because those of us here, basically already knew what your study conclusion would be.

For myself, yep if I binge due to emotions it’s going to be ultra processed crap which then just makes me want more of the same. However, I listen to my body. Many people just stuff their body and don’t pay any attention to the reactions they get when they do.
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Post by Meant2Move on Mon Jul 08, 2019 8:54 pm

Must admit, I've never had the urge to binge on broccoli!
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Post by Lovebird on Tue Jul 09, 2019 6:50 am

Meant2Move wrote:Must admit, I've never had the urge to binge on broccoli!

Then again, plenty here tend to binge on cherries while in season... Laughing and likely other fruits during summer months.

Don't consider that an eating disorder though..
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Post by Narrowminded on Tue Jul 09, 2019 8:02 am

cherries?? What cherries? You mean the half of a bag I had. Smile

I’m with you LB, love me some cherries.
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Post by sharperhawk on Tue Jul 09, 2019 12:36 pm

1 cup of red cherries with pits: 51 calories

1 Atkins almond butter protein truffle: 95 calories

1 MDA keto fridge fudge square: 231 calories

6 MDA cheese crisps: 220 calories

My guess is that minimizing use of recipes of any kind would be very effective for weight loss/maintenance. Pick one whole food, heat if necessary, add a low-calorie condiment if you like, and eat.
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Post by Lovebird on Mon Jul 15, 2019 5:37 am

sharperhawk wrote:My guess is that minimizing use of recipes of any kind would be very effective for weight loss/maintenance. Pick one whole food, heat if necessary, add a low-calorie condiment if you like, and eat.

Yes, ofcourse that would work. Stay away for baked goodies and keep it simple. This is also what Robb Wolf keeps saying and several others... it's the desire for making food entertaining that gets most people into trouble.

A cup of cherries? That would be about 100 grams... I can easily eat several if not careful.. Cool ofcourse savouring them is the right way.

Portioning works well with more calorie rich nutrient dense foods like nuts/seeds/avocados/olives/cheese etc as a little goes a long way, taste wise.
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Post by ONTARIO on Mon Jul 15, 2019 7:34 pm

Meant2Move wrote:Must admit, I've never had the urge to binge on broccoli!

This goes along with something I'm always saying, "Have you ever eaten ice-cream because you were hungry?". I know I surely don't eat ice-cream because I'm hungry. Wink

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